Quick Answer: What If My RA Test Is Negative?

Can you test negative for RA and still have it?

The quick answer is yes, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis does exist.

A seronegative test for rheumatoid arthritis means that a person tests negative for rheumatoid factor (RF) and cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP)..

Can a negative rheumatoid factor turn positive?

Your rheumatoid arthritis markers may change over time from negative to positive. Many people with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis develop RF or ACPA — often within the first two years of diagnosis, says Dr. Cush, noting that as many as 80 percent of seronegative cases will become seropositive over time.

Does rheumatoid arthritis always show up in blood work?

Rheumatoid arthritis can be difficult to diagnose in its early stages because the early signs and symptoms mimic those of many other diseases. There is no one blood test or physical finding to confirm the diagnosis. During the physical exam, your doctor will check your joints for swelling, redness and warmth.

What does a negative RF test mean?

A low number (negative result) most often means you do not have rheumatoid arthritis or Sjögren syndrome. However, some people who do have these conditions still have a negative or low RF. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories.

Can you have a negative ANA and still have rheumatoid arthritis?

When the results show negative for both anti-CCP and RF, but the person still exhibits multiple signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, this is a good indication of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. “Seronegative” simply means the person does not have the same antibodies that a person who is “seropositive” has.

What disease can mimic rheumatoid arthritis?

Lupus. When lupus, a systemic autoimmune disease, affects the joints, it can cause symptoms similar to RA. Most people with lupus also experience flares, where symptoms get worse, then improve or disappear. Other similar signs of lupus and RA include fatigue, fever, and dry eyes.